Co-presidents

  • 29 Mar 2017 10:09 AM
    Message # 4698404

    I'm posting this on behalf of someone else:  "The bylaws of a church group state that the officers will be President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer.  Several years ago, the sitting President needed hip replacement surgery and even though there was a Vice President, she asked for a Co-President to perform her duties.  Her request was granted and a Co-President served 2 terms.  Bylaws have not been changed to provide for a co-president and because there is difficulty in getting members to serve as President and Vice President, some board members are pushing to have Co-Presidents again. This doesn't seem right to me.  What can we do?"


  • 30 Mar 2017 7:48 AM
    Reply # 4702336 on 4698404

    Ann: John Stackpole, CPP, PRP,  wrote an EXCELLENT article in the July, 2009 issue of the National Parliamentarian titled "Problems with Co-Anything".

    I have a word document copy of it that John sent to me, but I don't have a link to the actual article.  I will try to find one, but I'm not sure that it is actually available online.  You probably know better than I do whether it is available on line and how to get a copy of it!  

    However, I will email you my copy of the article so that you can share it with your friend.  I have John's permission... and blessings... to share it with attribution.

    Last modified: 30 Mar 2017 7:48 AM | Richard Brown
  • 30 Mar 2017 7:54 AM
    Reply # 4702342 on 4698404

    By the way, as to the question, "What can we do?", I would suggest that if having co-presidents is brought up again that someone immediately raise a point of order that co-presidents are not authorized in the bylaws and that the bylaws must first be amended if there are going to be co-presidents.

    The fact that it was allowed in the past because "everyone looked the other way" and nobody raised a point of order is no reason to violate the bylaws again.

    My personal opinion is that a bylaw provision allowing co-presidents would be unwise for the reasons Dr. Stackpole mentions in his article.

  • 30 Mar 2017 9:03 AM
    Reply # 4702509 on 4698404
    Paul
    Ann Guiberson wrote:

    I'm posting this on behalf of someone else:  "The bylaws of a church group state that the officers will be President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer.  Several years ago, the sitting President needed hip replacement surgery and even though there was a Vice President, she asked for a Co-President to perform her duties.  Her request was granted and a Co-President served 2 terms.  Bylaws have not been changed to provide for a co-president and because there is difficulty in getting members to serve as President and Vice President, some board members are pushing to have Co-Presidents again. This doesn't seem right to me.  What can we do?"

    Where was the VP when this was happening? Filling in for the President would be the VP's job. If not the VP, then an other executive. Bottom line is it needs to be in the by-laws. 



  • 30 Mar 2017 11:38 PM
    Reply # 4703909 on 4698404

    Here is a link to John Stackpole's article, "Problems with Co-Anything" published in the July 2009 National Parliamentarian.  Ann, I highly recommend it to your friend!

     https://www.dropbox.com/s/jbcnnjcq5l9eaux/Problems%20With%20co-anything.docx?dl=0


  • 31 Mar 2017 2:10 AM
    Reply # 4704039 on 4698404
    Lawrence Cisar (Administrator)

    One problem is that in some parts of this world, the vice president does not automatically fill in for the president. Japan is an example of this. Be sure to check what are the procedural rules for where you are.

  • 2 Apr 2017 12:27 PM
    Reply # 4707761 on 4704039
    Lawrence Cisar wrote:

    One problem is that in some parts of this world, the vice president does not automatically fill in for the president. Japan is an example of this. Be sure to check what are the procedural rules for where you are.

    Larry, I'm curious:  When you say that in Japan "the vice president does not automatically fill in for the president", do you mean that the vice president does not automatically preside in the absence of the president, or that he does not automatically become the president in the event of a vacancy in the office of president?

    And if he doesn't automatically preside in the absence of the president, what are his usual duties in Japan?

    Just curious.  Always wanting to learn!


    Last modified: 2 Apr 2017 12:28 PM | Richard Brown
  • 2 Apr 2017 4:42 PM
    Reply # 4708045 on 4698404
    Lawrence Cisar (Administrator)

    In Japan, for a formally established non-profit, the Board elects a presiding officer if the President is absent. If the President leaves office, a new President needs to be elected by the proper authority (often the Board). Vice Presidential duties need to be defined otherwise in the Bylaws. A group that does not become a legal entity can do what they want.

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